Prevent Windows 10 from Installing Device Drivers Automatically

By default, Windows 10 is set to automatically detect, download and install updates for driver software. And, yes, it’s possible to turn off this feature. But finding where to disable it requires some digging.

image

For over 12 years, my recommendation and best practice has been to disable Microsoft from automatically updating driver software. It’s been a love/hate relationship with this feature for me. No sooner do I get comfortable with Microsoft’s ability to successfully install drivers, than an other driver issue pops up. I’ve made it a point to stop Microsoft from doing driver updates, and just go to the vendor’s web site and check for updates myself.

If you wish to turn off this feature in Windows 10, here are the steps:

  1. From the Windows 10 taskbar, type in system
  2. Click on System Control panel
  3. Click on Advanced system settings
  4. Click on the Hardware tab, then click on the Device Installation Settings button
  5. Click (to select) the option: No, let me choose what to do
  6. This will then display three more choices.
  7. Click (to select) Never install driver software from Windows Update
  8. Click on the Save Changes button

And here are the associated screen shots:

Steps 1 & 2:

image

Step 3

image

Step 4

image

Step 5

image

Step 6 & 7

image

Windows 10 RSAT Now Available

Microsoft released the Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT) for Windows 10 on Aug-18-2015. This can only be installed on computers running the full release of Windows 10 Professional or Enterprise. The RSAT tool comes in both a 32-bit and 64-bit version.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=45520

WordPress 4.2 EasyWPGuide for Free!

imageI don’t do a lot of website development for clients, but when I do, I use WordPress.

For several years now, I will provide my clients with a PDF copy of EasyWPGuide, which is available for free! There is also an online version.

The manuals were recently updated to reflect the changes in WordPress 4.2.

Anthony Hortin, the author, writes:

“I created the Easy WP Guide for WordPress consultants to give to clients as a form of training. I know it’s not always possible to physically go to a clients location to provide them hands-on training. Instead, give them a copy of my popular WordPress manual and in simple, easy to read language, you can teach your clients how to use their new WordPress website.”

CCleaner and Microsoft Edge

Are you running Windows 10? Are you a CCleaner aficionado? CCleaner is a great program for cleaning up temp files that build up over time on your computer.

An upgrade to CCleaner (version 5.08.5308 at the time of this post) is needed to run properly with Windows 10 and the new Microsoft Edge browser.

When you do run CCleaner to clean, however, you may encounter the following pop up window message:

Microsoft Edge Cache Database needs to be closed to clean the Internet cache. Do you want CCleaner to close Microsoft Edge Cache Database?

image

The reason for the error message, according to Piriform, is that the Microsoft Edge database is also used by other programs  or apps on your computer.

Now, you may be thinking, “I’ll just click on the ‘Do not show me this message again’” button.

Go ahead and try it. But my experience is that the box will show up again next time you run CCleaner.

But, before you get mad at Microsoft, if you use Google Chrome, you may already be familiar with a similar pop up window telling you that Google Chrome needs to be closed in order to clean the Internet cache.

image

Flash Player Action Script Warnings on IE11

After Tuesday August 11, 2015, many users began to report receiving Flash Player alerts or warnings when using Internet Explorer 11 (IE11) on Windows 8.1 or Windows 2012R2. These popups warn about action scripts and other flash features.

The good news is that there is nothing to worry about. Your computer was NOT hacked or infected.

What happened was that in the August 2015 Windows updates, Microsoft accidentally updated the embedded flash player in IE11 with the “debugger” version of flash player instead of the normal version.

Microsoft has updated the notes for KB3087916 to reflect this known issue, which Microsoft says should be fixed by August 18th.

Windows 10 and SBS 2008 Remote Web Workplace RWW

Customer calls me today. One of his employees has Windows 10 at home, but is unable to remote into the SBS 2008 network at the office to access his office computer.

The error message looks something like this:

VBScript Remote Desktop Connection: The wizard cannot configure Remote Desktop Connection settings.  Make sure that the client version of Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) 6.0 or later is installed on this computer.

Thanks to a post on the Microsoft forum, the resolution is fairly easy. It requires access to the server, but does not require rebooting the server.

Note: On the Windows 10 side, you need to make sure you are using Internet Explorer 11 (IE11) and not the new Microsoft Edge browser.

From the SBS server:

  • Navigate to this folder “C:\Program Files\Windows Small Business Server\Bin\webapp\Remote”
  • Locate and make a backup copy of the file tsweb.aspx
  • Edit tsweb.aspx and comment out the highlighted lined as shown below. (Note: to comment out a line, simply insert a single quote mark)
    BEFORE
    image 
    AFTER
    image
  • Open up Services (Start –> Run –> services.msc)
  • Locate Terminal Services and click to restart it.
    image 
  • It may prompt you that it must also restart an associated service, which you should approve.
  • That’s all that needs to be done on the server

From the home Windows 10 computer:

  • Open up Internet Explorer 11
  • Go to the URL you use to remote into the SBS 2008 server (e.g.., https://remote.domain.com/remote)
  • Add the URL to Compatibility Settings (IE > Tools > Compatibility Settings > Add > Close)
  • Add the URL you are using to Trusted Sites (IE > Tools > Internet Options > Security > Trusted Sites)
  • Then close and restart IE 11

Give it a try!

Windows 10 Editions

There are 4 primary editions of Windows 10 – Home, Pro, Enterprise, and Education. Microsoft has published a table comparing the features of each edition.

Existing Fundamentals

Home

Pro

Enterprise

Education

Device Encryption1

x

x

x

x

Domain Join

 

x

x

x

Group Policy Management

 

x

x

x

Bitlocker2

 

x

x

x

Enterprise Mode Internet Explorer (EMIE)

 

x

x

x

Assigned Access 8.1

 

x

x

x

Remote Desktop

 

x

x

x

Client Hyper-V

 

x

x

x

DirectAccess

   

x

x

Windows To Go Creator

   

x

x

AppLocker

   

x

x

BranchCache

   

x

x

Start Screen Control with Group Policy

   

x

x

Management and Deployment

Side-loading of line of business apps

x

x

x

x

Mobile device management

x 6

x

x

x

Ability to join Azure Active Directory, with single sign-on to cloud-hosted apps7

 

x

x

x

Business Store for Windows 108

 

x

x

x

Granular UX Control

   

x

x

Easy Upgrade from Pro to Enterprise Edition

 

x

x

 

Easy Upgrade from Home to Education Edition

x

   

x

Business experiences

Security

Home

Pro

Enterprise

Education

Microsoft Passport

x

x

x

x

Enterprise Data Protection8

 

x

x

x

Credential Guard9

   

x

x

Device Guard9

   

x

x

Delivering Windows as a Service

Windows Update

x

x

x

x

Windows Update for Business

 

x

x

x

Current Branch for Business

 

x

x

x

Long Term Servicing Branch

   

x

 

1 – Requires InstantGo or device that passes the “Device Encryption Requirements Test”
2 – Requires TPM 1.2 or greater
3 – Cortana is available only in certain markets; Experience may vary by region and device; Requires Microsoft Account to use
4 – Windows Hello requires specialized hardware, including fingerprint reader, illuminated IR sensor or other biometric sensors
5 – Requires touch screen capabilities; App experiences may vary
6 – Coming Later. Subject to Change. Learn moreabout delivering Windows as a service
7 – Separate license for Azure Active Directory required
8 – Coming Later. Subject to Change
9 – Requires UEFI 2.3.1 or greater; Virtualization Extensions such as Intel VT-x, AMD-V, and SLAT must be enabled; x64 version of Windows; IOMMU, such as Intel VT-d, AMD-Vi; TPM 2.0; BIOS Lockdown

Roboform, Windows 10 and Microsoft Edge

I have used Roboform as my password manager solution for what seems like forever. But forever may be coming to an end.

I upgraded my business workstation and laptops over the weekend to Windows 10. Except for a video driver issue and a Bios update, the in-place migration went very smooth. And, for the most part, I’m loving Windows 10.

However …

I was looking forward to really testing out Microsoft Edge, which is the new browser software that Microsoft released along with Windows 10, and it is intended to eventually replace Internet Explorer.

But, according to this Roboform post, Microsoft Edge does not currently support “extensions”, and therefore Roboform will not work with the new browser. According to several websites, support for extensions will not be coming to Microsoft Edge until later this fall. Aarrgghh!!!! 

imageRoboform offers three workarounds …

  1. Make Internet Explorer 10 your default browser, rather than Microsoft Edge.
    Fortunately, Windows 10 comes with both Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer.

    To make IE your default browser, click Start –> Control Panel –> Default Programs –> Set your default programs –> locate Internet Explorer –> click “Set this program as default

  2. Use Firefox or Chrome as your default browser
  3. Or, if you open up a website from within Microsoft Edge, you can click on the “three dotted” icon on the top right, and then select to open that web page using Internet Explorer.

Windows 10 – I Like It!

There is a term often used in companies that develop products called “eating your own dogfood”. The basic concept is that if you expect your customer to use a product, then you should be using it.

So last night I took the jump from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10. It took less time to install Windows 10 than it did for me to make a full backup of my workstation, which has lots of videos, music, and pictures, as well as lot’s of large ISO files.

I had previously download the Windows 10 Pro to a USB stick, and was planning to do an in-place upgrade. Here is my timeline:

  • 10:08pm last night (22:08 for some of you), start the Windows 10 setup program
  • 10:10pm Getting Important Updates …
  • 10:14pm Ready to Install
  • 10:33pm Update completed and ready to log in
  • 10:34pm Setting up Apps
  • 10:35pm Desktop set up and ready to go. Received message that newer video/graphics drivers were required. DisplayLink required
  • 10:44pm Installed newer B/IOS, rebooted, and DisplayLink adapter started working, and I had all three monitors working.

I did a preliminary check of various applications with no identifiable issues, including Audacity 2.1, Adobe Acrobat 11, UltraEdit 22, CuteFTP 9, Calendar Creator 12, Office 2013, MaxFoxcus RMM Dashboard, MaxFocus Mail, Advanced IP, “God Mode”, Firefox, Chrome, Edge, MAlwareBytes, SAS, CClenaer, Splashtop, Quicken 2015, Windows Live Writer, Dropbox, scanning from my Visioneer 9250, and printing to my Dell 1710 Laser Printer and my HP Officejet Pro 8600.

So far, my take on Windows 10? Well, quoting the Rocketeer … “I Like It!”


The Rocketeer – Disney Video

Bitdefender Forced an Unannounced Update for Windows 10

Recently, I have been testing Bitdefender with several of my clients, as it is now the preferred managed A/V solution from MaxFocus (formerly GFI).

This afternoon (Thursday 30-July-2015) we started receiving reports from customers that their workstations were suddenly rebooting. It turns out that Bitdefender has a new certified version of their software for Windows 10 which they wanted to push out today.

MaxFocus, for their part, did send out an email alert on Wednesday regarding this upcoming update. Shame on me for not seeing the email.

We received notification that Bitdefender has a new certified version for Windows 10 that we wish to roll out to the Bitdefender-powered Managed Antivirus service. This update will download automatically on current Release Candidate (RC) installs of Bitdefender MAV. We’re planning to push this update around 15:00 GMT on Thursday 30 July.

In this instance, the Bitdefender engine update will require a reboot of the end-point device, irrespective of its operating system. While Bitdefender engine updates will not normally require a reboot, this particular one does because of the release of Windows 10, and we want to ensure customers are aware. You can set the desired reboot behaviour within the Bitdefender MAV policy.