Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup 17 Released

The Microsoft’s Exchange Team released Rollup 17 for Exchange 2007 SP3 (KB 3056710) on June 16, 2015

This release provide minor improvements and fixes for customer reported issues.

Download Update Rollup 17 for Exchange Server 2007 SP3

Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 10 Released

The Microsoft’s Exchange Team released Rollup 10 for Exchange 2010 SP3 (KB 3049853) on June 16, 2015

This release provide minor improvements and fixes for customer reported issues. Update Rollup 10 is the last scheduled release for Exchange Server 2010. Exchange Server 2010 is in extended support and will receive security and time zone fixes on-demand on a go-forward basis.

Download Update Rollup 10 for Exchange Server 2010 SP3 (KB3049853)

Note: although RU10 is labeled as the last scheduled release for Exchange 2010, they indicate that a future update (RU11) will be required in order to support upgrading to Exchange 2016. But as no release date for Exchange 2016 has been announced, this information is subject to change.

SBS and Essentials External Backup Drives Compatibility List

I recently encountered an issue with an external drive connected to a SBS 2011 server. The backup had errored and the issue was with the external drive.

Finally, I was reminded about the Technet blog post on Windows Small Business Server – External Backup Drives Compatibility List. The post has two parts:

  • Guidelines on proper formatting requirements of the external drive, with an explanation of why 512 Bytes sectors are required.
  • List of external drives for a variety of vendors, with a rating table that indicates if it works on the various versions of SBS and Essentials 2012/R2.

The post also documents a simple command that you can use to check the sector size of your external drive. Be sure to do it from an elevated command prompt. The command is:

fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo X:

Here’s an example of the results:

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PowerShell for O365 Now Available!

Microsoft announced yesterday (June 30, 2015) the availability of the PowerShell for Office 365 for IT administrators.

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I would suggest that you first read their blog post on Getting Started with PowerShell for O365.

PowerShell for O365 is not intended to replace the O365 Admin Center, but rather it provides complementary tools for such scenarios as:

  • Adding or editing a large number of users
  • Using multiple filters when sorting data
  • Exporting data such as user lists and groups
  • And more …

The web site includes sample scripts, scenarios, and community interaction. Check it out!

O365 Status Web Sites

Here are some useful web sites to check on the current status and outages for O365 —

Office 365 Down Detector: https://downdetector.com/status/office-365

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Office 365 Service Health Status: http://status.office365.com/

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Office 365 Twitter Status: https://twitter.com/office365status

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Update on Essentials O365 Wizard Issue

Earlier I posted about a situation where the O365 Integration Wizard that is built into the 2012 R2 Essentials Server would fail when trying to set it up the first time.

http://kwsupport.com/2015/05/2012-r2-essentials-fails-to-integrate-with-o365/

Today, the Windows Essentials and SBS support team posted a revised blog saying that the problem with the PCNS.zip file had been resolved.

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http://blogs.technet.com/b/sbs/archive/2015/05/29/windows-server-2012-essentials-r2-essentials-may-fail-to-integrate-with-microsoft-office-365.aspx

The revision eliminates the need to download the correct PCNS.zip file. Apparently there’s no hotfix or update to be downloaded. They fixed it on their end so that when you run the O365 wizard it will download the correct zip file.

How to Configure a Custom Domain Suffix when Installing Windows 2012 R2 Essentials

For as long as I can remember, Microsoft’s Small Business Server (SBS) and Essentials Server would default to using .local for the internal domain suffix during installation. So, if your company name was Contoso, it would create Contoso.local as your internal domain.

And for me, using .local worked great all these years. The customer would still use .com (such as Contoso.com) for their public web site and for their email address. Contoso.local was strictly for internal DNS purposes.

But SSL Certificate authorities have announced that they will not issue new UCC/SAN SSL certificates that contain non-public local Intranet domain suffixes (such as .local) or IP addresses.

See detail announcements from these vendors: GoDaddy   DigiCert  

So … the question was raised recently within my Microsoft MVP group: how does one install Windows Server 2012R2 Essentials with a custom internal domain suffix, since by default Essentials uses .local?

My good MVP friend, Robert Pearman, took the time to post a solution today on his blog site. He gives step by step instructions, along with screen shots:

http://titlerequired.com/2015/06/27/install-windows-server-essentials-with-a-custom-domain-suffix/

Here is a quick summary of the steps:

  • Perform the pre-install of Essentials 2012 R2
  • When the Essentials Configuration Wizard (ECW) starts up, click CANCEL.
  • From System Properties, change the name of your server
  • Now add Active Directory Domain Services as a server role (Systems Manager > Manage > Add Roles and Features) and use all the defaults.
  • Then run the Post Deployment task and promote the server to a domain controller.
    • Select to create a new forest and enter your root domain name.
    • Note: many now suggest using a subdomain of your public domain name. So if your public domain is Contoso.com, you might use Corp.Contoso.com)
    • After the pre-requisite check, use the defaults to complete the install of the server role.
    • After the server has rebooted, login as the domain admin, and the ECW will start up again.

Remote command line to delete subfolders

This is a follow up to my post regarding 44,175 folders being created in a temp folder due to a bad definition file from Vipre/MAV.

The system in question had frozen up, and after we rebooted the server, I was not able to login using my normal remote control software (TeamViewer). But I was able to access the system from a remote command prompt.

That’s how I discovered the 44,175 folders. The question was: how do I delete all those sub folders?

A quick web search uncovered a usable solution, and after a test to verify it would work, I was ready to delete all those folders.

Here’s the command I used (obviously, enter the appropriate parent directory):

for /D %p in (c:\users\don\appdata\local\temp\*.*) do rmdir “%p” /s /q

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Quickbooks dbdata11.dll and Vipre/MAV

Friday morning (6-26-2015) I started receiving calls from several of my customers saying that they could not run Quickbooks, and that they were getting an alert that the file “dbdata11.dll” has been quarantined.

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With the help of other members of The ASCII Group, we quickly determined that it was a false positive due to a bad definition file update from Vipre (or the RMM version called MAV).

Soon after, MAXFocus (previously GFI) sent out a service status alert of the issue, and that it had been resolved with definition version 41468 and above. It was recommended to add the file (dbdata11.dll) to the Vipre/MAV exception list, before updating systems with the newer definition file.

Note: make an exception only for the file, and not the folder and file, as the folder name is randomly generated by QuickBooks.

That should have been it. Right? … Wrong!

I received a call from one of my users saying that one of their systems with QuickBooks installed on it had locked up. At about the same time they reported this issue, I received an email alert from the RMM service I use saying that the C: drive of this system had dropped to below 20% free space.

Once we got the system rebooted, I logged in and discovered that there 44,175 folder taking up nearly 62GB of disk space. The location of these folders were in C:\Users\QBDataServiceUser22\appdata\local\temp. Each of these folders contained a single file: dbdata11.dll.

It turns out that every time Vipre/MAV quarantined this file, QuickBooks created a new temp folder with the same file!

So once I had the A/V definition file updated, and we rebooted the system, I went in and safely deleted all 44,175 folders! 

What a fun way to spend a Friday!

Single stray .avhd Hyper-V snapshot file exists

I have a client with a Windows 2008R2 Hyper-V parent, and guest VMs. I was preparing to upgrade their Altaro Hyper-V software from version 4 to version 5, when I discovered that there was a single, stray snapshot file (.avhd) for one of the guest VMs. The strange thing is that the Hyper-V console was not showing that any snapshots exist or had been created for this VM.

I did some poking around, and buried in this Microsoft forum post was a response from Pablo which worked perfectly for me. His response is dated January 28, 2014.

Here are the steps he recommended and that I performed (again this was on a 2008 R2 Hyper-V server):

  • Shutdown the VM in question
  • On the right frame of the Hyper-V click on Snapshot and create a new snapshot. You can confirm this by going to the folder where the .avhd file exists, and you should now see a second .avhd file.
  • Return to the Hyper-V console, and from the middle frame, right click on the snapshot and select to delete the snapshot.
  • Over on the right frame you will see a message that a merge is in process.
  • Once the merge is completed, both .avhd files had been automatically removed from the folder location.