Archive for Microsoft

Black Screen after Windows 10 15042 Insider Build

It was recently posted by OnMSFT that a small percentage of PCs may fail to update to the 15042 Insider Build. When that happens, your computer will hang on a black screen after reboot. I know … I just encountered it.

Fortunately, I was aware of the bug before I proceeded, and knew where to go to get the fix. thanks to this post from Microsoft Answers!

Here’s what you need to do:

  • If you computer already is hung, you will need to do a hard reboot (or two) which should force the computer to revert back to the previous version.
  • Then log in, open up an administrative level command prompt, and then type (or copy and paste) enter each of these instructions – one at a time – into the command window:

    reg delete HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\system\setup\upgrade\nsimigrationroot /f

    netsh int ipv6 set locality state=disabled

    reg delete HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Nsi\{eb004a01-9b1a-11d4-9123-0050047759bc}\28 /f

  • After this, close the command prompt window, reboot, and re-scan for updates.

As always, if you are in the insider ring, it pays to stay up-to-date on insider releases and issues.Insider releases are NOT meant to be run on production machines.

Windows 10 Memory Compression

I came across a very interesting 30 minute video from Microsoft Channel 9 that discusses the evolution of how Windows handles memory – paging, cache, and now memory compression – from Windows 7 to Windows 10.

You can see if your memory is being compressed by going to Task Manager –> Performance –> Memory.

image

Here is the video from Microsoft’s Channel 9:

How to Stop Windows 10 from Installing an Update

Have you encountered a situation where Windows 10 will try to install an update that you don’t want installed? Perhaps for a non-existent printer? Or an update that you just aren’t ready to test, like a new video driver?

Windows 10 seems to love doing things automatically, without any real control over what it does. Fellow MVP’er, Susan Bradley, pointed me to a Microsoft driver tool that will allow you to resume control of some of these updates and troubleshoot such situations.

Check out Microsoft KB 3073930 titled: How to temporarily prevent Windows or driver update from reinstalling in Windows 10

  1. When you click on the link, you will be prompted to run or save “wushowhide.diagcab”. Go ahead and select run.
    image
  2. Click Next to proceed:
    image
  3. Now you can select to hide updates, or to show hidden updates:
    image

Security Patch MS16-072 Breaks GPO on SBS 2008, SBS 2011, and Windows Server 2008/2008R2

Microsoft recently released security hotfix MS16-072 last week. This patch attempts to improve GPO security. But as my fellow MVP’s Susan Bradley and Wayne Small have discovered, this new security update can actually break certain GPO based processes, such as WSUS.

Note: Microsoft has not released a fix to this, nor are we expecting them to do so. But the blog posts below offer instructions for manually fixing this issue.

Here are the two blog posts that Wayne Small posted on his site, identifying the problem and suggested work arounds:

Susan Bradley forwarded the following post from Group Policy Central which includes a PowerShell script and further instructions from Microsoft to manually fix this problem.

Beware of Microsoft Tricking You Into Installing Windows 10

I’ll keep this short, sweet and to the point. Beware of the “Windows 10 Upgrade” notice!

First, I really like Windows 10, and I encourage people when buying a new computer to get Windows 10. I have also done a fair number of in-place upgrades to Windows 10. All of them were successful upgrades, although I had unique challenges with two of them that took time to resolve.

Microsoft released Windows 10 at the end of July 2015, and made it a free upgrade for most people. In the past six months, Microsoft has been pushing nag messages and prompts to remind you to upgrade to Windows 10.

But, with less than two months to go, Microsoft has upped the nagging to almost full scale trickery. The details can be read in this PCWorld article.

But here is the catch: you may think you are saying “No” to the Windows 10 upgrade by clicking on the X in the top right corner of the popup window. But it’s just the opposite. Clicking on the X is being treated the same as clicking on OK at the bottom of the window.

image

Please be careful!

Microsoft Phone Business Sold

Lumia 950The writing has been on the wall for this announcement, as far as I’m concerned, since the day Microsoft bought Nokia’s phone business back in 2013.  They spent $7.2 billion to purchase Nokia.

And today it’s announced that they’re selling it for $350 million to IH Mobile and HMB Global.

Aarrgghh …

You can read more of the details here and here.

Long Live Exchange Public Folders!

Back in 1996, Microsoft introduced Public Folders as a replacement for social aliases, and was “designed from the ground up to enhance group collaboration applications” (per this Lane Severson blog post)

By the time that Exchange 2003 was released (13 years ago!), however,  the rumors that public folders would be discontinued in a future release of Exchange were swirling around. Take for instance this WindowsIT Pro post from 2004:

The handwriting has been on the wall for public folders for a year or two. I first heard a Microsoft speaker strongly discourage use of public folders at the MEC 2002 conference. An administrator who attended the same session was in a state of near panic because her university has thousands of public folders in active use.

In a TechRepublic 2010 post it was declared that public folders would probably be gone by Exchange 2013:

Since before the release of Exchange 2007, Microsoft has been telling us that public folders will eventually be discontinued. This hasn’t happened just yet though. Public folders are alive and well in Exchange 2010. Even so, public folders probably won’t be supported in the next version of Exchange.

So here we are in 2016, and guess what? Not only are public folders still around, Microsoft has decided that “public folders are great” per this Microsoft Technet FAQ:

No. Public folders are great for Outlook integration, simple sharing scenarios, and for allowing large audiences to access the same data.

And on February 1, 2016, Microsoft announced they will be increasing the number of public folder mailboxes in Exchange 2016 from 100 to 1,000!

Happy 20th birthday to Public Folders!

Awarded MVP for 2016 (13th year)

imageYea!!!    I received my official announcement from Microsoft today that I was awarded as a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) for 2016.

This is my 13th consecutive year as an MVP. I still consider it a great honor to be involved with the MVP organization, and especially working with the Server sub-group team that I have been a part of for all these years.

image

When I was first recognized as an MVP back in 2004, the group I was part of was named “Windows Small Business Server” (SBS). Then in 2013 our group was renamed “Windows Server for Small & Medium Business” (WSSMB). In October 2015, we became part of the new “Cloud and Datacenter Management” MVP group.

The name change reflects the evolving nature of server technology and how it is used and implemented in businesses. What doesn’t change is our call to inspire and help people solve problems and discover new capabilities.

Happy New Years!

Review Microsoft License Terms

If you did not know, Microsoft provides a handy web page to view the licensing terms for all of its current products:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/useterms

Drop downs allow you to select the product, the version and the language.

image

Just Received My Lumia 950 Windows 10 Phone

I will be honest. My first two smart phones years ago were Apple iPhones.  I had an iPhone 3, and liked it enough to upgrade to an iPhone 4. I enjoyed them both. I refuse to use the word “love” when talking about a phone!  I also have a Galaxy tablet back then.

When Microsoft came out with their Windows 8 phones, I knew I wanted to try one. So I went with the Nokia Lumia 920 three years ago. I liked it enough that when the phone cracked from repeated drops to the floor, I picked up an exact replacement.

But I’ve been biding my time for the Windows 10 phones to come out.

http://www.dispatchreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Lumia-950.jpgMicrosoft recently announced the Lumia 950 and Lumia 950 XL. I wanted to get the XL as it is slightly larger, but I decided to go with the Lumia 950 due to pricing and availability through AT&T, who released it on Nov 20th.

I will write up a report of my experience in a week or two. I have some an upcoming trip and will get to utilize the phone a lot during that time. I’m anxiously awaiting arrival of my Microsoft Docking Device

But my first impressions of the 950 are good ones. I was able to restore all my apps, settings, files and pictures. I was able to activate my SIM/Cellular from a web page or phone (so no driving to the local AT&T store to do it). It’s a cleaner image than the Windows 8 phone.

So, in the words of The Rocket Man … “I like it!”