Archive for Windows 10

Preview PowerShell Scripts in File Explorer

The ability to preview PowerShell (.ps1) scripts from Window’s File Explorer is not enabled by default, or so it seems. A quick one line PowerShell command fixes that in a jiffy!

  • Right click on PowerShell and select to “run as administrator”
  • Then copy and paste the following:
    Set-ItemProperty Registry::HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.ps1 -Name PerceivedType -Value text

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That’s it! Open up File Explorer and you’ll now be able to preview PowerShell scripts!

P.S. This was tested on Windows 10

Black Screen after Windows 10 15042 Insider Build

It was recently posted by OnMSFT that a small percentage of PCs may fail to update to the 15042 Insider Build. When that happens, your computer will hang on a black screen after reboot. I know … I just encountered it.

Fortunately, I was aware of the bug before I proceeded, and knew where to go to get the fix. thanks to this post from Microsoft Answers!

Here’s what you need to do:

  • If you computer already is hung, you will need to do a hard reboot (or two) which should force the computer to revert back to the previous version.
  • Then log in, open up an administrative level command prompt, and then type (or copy and paste) enter each of these instructions – one at a time – into the command window:

    reg delete HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\system\setup\upgrade\nsimigrationroot /f

    netsh int ipv6 set locality state=disabled

    reg delete HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Nsi\{eb004a01-9b1a-11d4-9123-0050047759bc}\28 /f

  • After this, close the command prompt window, reboot, and re-scan for updates.

As always, if you are in the insider ring, it pays to stay up-to-date on insider releases and issues.Insider releases are NOT meant to be run on production machines.

Windows 10 Workstation Shows Offline Status and No Backups from 2012 R2 Essentials Dashboard

It’s been well documented that updates for Windows 10 (such as the 1607 Anniversary update) will cause issues with interfacing to the 2012 R2 Essentials Server. Two things in particular:

  • Workstations will have a status of Offline on the Essentials Dashboard
  • More importantly, client workstation backups are not up to date

Until now, the process that I had taken to resolve this on each workstation was as follows:

  • Drop workstation to Workgroup
  • Login as local administrator (not domain)
  • Run http://{servername}/connect
  • Use domain admin login and password to proceed, when prompted
  • Approve (acknowledge) you want to use the domain admin login
  • Complete rejoining to the server
  • Reboot workstation and login as domain user

Well, now, it comes to pass that we can make this process a bit faster, as we can eliminate the first two steps (dropping workstation to a workgroup, and logging in with the local admin account).

So here’s how the steps now look, while remaining logged in as the current domain user account:

  • Run http://{servername}/connect
  • Use domain admin login and password to proceed, when prompted
  • Approve (acknowledge) you want to use the domain admin login
  • Complete rejoining to the server
  • It’s possible to just logoff and log back in as the current domain user. However, I still like to reboot the workstation just to make sure all is fine.

Windows 10 Memory Compression

I came across a very interesting 30 minute video from Microsoft Channel 9 that discusses the evolution of how Windows handles memory – paging, cache, and now memory compression – from Windows 7 to Windows 10.

You can see if your memory is being compressed by going to Task Manager –> Performance –> Memory.

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Here is the video from Microsoft’s Channel 9:

How to Stop Windows 10 from Installing an Update

Have you encountered a situation where Windows 10 will try to install an update that you don’t want installed? Perhaps for a non-existent printer? Or an update that you just aren’t ready to test, like a new video driver?

Windows 10 seems to love doing things automatically, without any real control over what it does. Fellow MVP’er, Susan Bradley, pointed me to a Microsoft driver tool that will allow you to resume control of some of these updates and troubleshoot such situations.

Check out Microsoft KB 3073930 titled: How to temporarily prevent Windows or driver update from reinstalling in Windows 10

  1. When you click on the link, you will be prompted to run or save “wushowhide.diagcab”. Go ahead and select run.
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  2. Click Next to proceed:
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  3. Now you can select to hide updates, or to show hidden updates:
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Beware of Microsoft Tricking You Into Installing Windows 10

I’ll keep this short, sweet and to the point. Beware of the “Windows 10 Upgrade” notice!

First, I really like Windows 10, and I encourage people when buying a new computer to get Windows 10. I have also done a fair number of in-place upgrades to Windows 10. All of them were successful upgrades, although I had unique challenges with two of them that took time to resolve.

Microsoft released Windows 10 at the end of July 2015, and made it a free upgrade for most people. In the past six months, Microsoft has been pushing nag messages and prompts to remind you to upgrade to Windows 10.

But, with less than two months to go, Microsoft has upped the nagging to almost full scale trickery. The details can be read in this PCWorld article.

But here is the catch: you may think you are saying “No” to the Windows 10 upgrade by clicking on the X in the top right corner of the popup window. But it’s just the opposite. Clicking on the X is being treated the same as clicking on OK at the bottom of the window.

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Please be careful!

Microsoft Phone Business Sold

Lumia 950The writing has been on the wall for this announcement, as far as I’m concerned, since the day Microsoft bought Nokia’s phone business back in 2013.  They spent $7.2 billion to purchase Nokia.

And today it’s announced that they’re selling it for $350 million to IH Mobile and HMB Global.

Aarrgghh …

You can read more of the details here and here.

Top Support Solutions and Issues for Windows 10

Microsoft’s Technet website posted detail solutions to a wide variety of common Windows 10 issues on May 3rd, 2016.

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/topsupportsolutions/2016/05/03/top-support-solutions-for-windows-10-2/

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Here’s a quick overview of topics covered:

SOLUTIONS RELATED TO …

  1. Installing or upgrading Windows 10 with free upgrade offer
  2. Inability to activate Windows
  3. Installing Windows updates or hotfixes
  4. Common setup, installation and deployment issues
  5. Windows Volume Activation
  6. Installing or upgrading Windows
  7. Configuring or managing the Start menu or the Desktop Shell
  8. Wireless networking and 802.1X authentication
  9. Blank desktop or Start Menu
  10. Sysprep and Imaging

Active Hours in Windows 10

Active Hours is a new feature recently released within the Insider (beta) version of Windows 10, and will be part of the upcoming anniversary release of Windows 10.

Think of Active hours as your business work hours, or the time frame that you most use your computer. By setting Active Hours, you can make sure that your computer will NOT automatically restart after updates are installed during those times.

By default, Active Hours is defined as 8am to 5pm (relative to your time zone).image

To change your Active Hours,

  • Click Windows+I to go to the Settings app
  • Click Update & security
  • Click Change active hours

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Unfortunately, the valid range for active hours is 10 hours. And, keep in mind – you are defining your busiest work hours so as to avoid automatic reboots. Personally, I would have preferred if this would have been the  time frame when we would want reboots to occur.

And for those Group Policy people, yes, Active Hours can be set and changed within the Group Policy Editor.

Go to:  Local Computer Policy –> Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Updates and locate the “Turn off auto-restart for updates during active hours” policy.

Just Installed Windows 10 Build 14328

I’m on the Microsoft Insider list for Windows 10, which provides beta releases of Windows 10 as Microsoft makes them available.

Over the weekend, Build 14328 was made available, and for the most part, it’s getting rave reviews. Sure, there are things people don’t like, features not yet implemented, and outstanding issues (mostly with drivers) – but overall, it seems to me that Windows 10 is getting pretty stable.

The obvious big change with this build is a somewhat revamped Start Menu, or what Microsoft now calls the “Start Experience”. You still have the list of all apps in alphabetical order, as well as your tile menu.But you now have a selection of important functions, such as Power, Settings and File Explorer along the left rail (see below).

So, if you are on the Insider Build list, give this new build a run. But please remember, it is BETA, which means unexpected bugs can occur, and even system crashes. All that is to say – don’t install BETA software on a production system unless you are willing to take the risk ANDE you have good backup!

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