Archive for Windows

How to Fix Windows 7 Update

Lots of complaints about Windows 7 Update being broken or not working right. What happens is that when you select to run Windows update, it will just sit their spinning for hours on end. Some people have left it running for 24 hours.

So frustrating. I know. BTDT.

So, here are the steps that I follow to fix the Windows 7 Update issue:

  1. Set Windows Update to not update
    Open up Windows Update, click on Change Settings, then click to NOT update
  2. Stop the Windows Update service
    You can do this by running services.msc
    Then locate and right click on the Windows Update service, then click to STOP  the service.
  3. Delete certain files from the Software Distribution folder
    Open up File Explorer and drill down C:/Windows/SoftwareDistribution
    Open up the Download subfolder and delete all files within the folder
    Go back a level, open up the DataStore folder and delete all the files within the folder
  4. Download the July 2016 Windows 7 Update Rollup (KB 3172605)
    Open Internet Explorer and go to https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3172605 
    Scroll down to Method 3 (Microsoft Update Catalog)
    Click on the link and install the Microsoft Update Catalog utility
    Click to select the appropriate download for Windows 7
    Click to View Basket in the top right
    Verify the selected file then click Download
    Select the location to download the file
  5. Install the July 2016 Windows 7 Update Rollup, then Reboot
    Use File Explorer, locate the download file, then double click to run/install it
    Follow the prompts to install it
  6. Reboot your computer
    Rebooting your computer will make sure that the Windows Service is restarted properly
  7. Rerun Windows Update
    Hopefully it will now work for you

How to Stop Windows 10 from Installing an Update

Have you encountered a situation where Windows 10 will try to install an update that you don’t want installed? Perhaps for a non-existent printer? Or an update that you just aren’t ready to test, like a new video driver?

Windows 10 seems to love doing things automatically, without any real control over what it does. Fellow MVP’er, Susan Bradley, pointed me to a Microsoft driver tool that will allow you to resume control of some of these updates and troubleshoot such situations.

Check out Microsoft KB 3073930 titled: How to temporarily prevent Windows or driver update from reinstalling in Windows 10

  1. When you click on the link, you will be prompted to run or save “wushowhide.diagcab”. Go ahead and select run.
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  2. Click Next to proceed:
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  3. Now you can select to hide updates, or to show hidden updates:
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Security Patch MS16-072 Breaks GPO on SBS 2008, SBS 2011, and Windows Server 2008/2008R2

Microsoft recently released security hotfix MS16-072 last week. This patch attempts to improve GPO security. But as my fellow MVP’s Susan Bradley and Wayne Small have discovered, this new security update can actually break certain GPO based processes, such as WSUS.

Note: Microsoft has not released a fix to this, nor are we expecting them to do so. But the blog posts below offer instructions for manually fixing this issue.

Here are the two blog posts that Wayne Small posted on his site, identifying the problem and suggested work arounds:

Susan Bradley forwarded the following post from Group Policy Central which includes a PowerShell script and further instructions from Microsoft to manually fix this problem.

Beware of Microsoft Tricking You Into Installing Windows 10

I’ll keep this short, sweet and to the point. Beware of the “Windows 10 Upgrade” notice!

First, I really like Windows 10, and I encourage people when buying a new computer to get Windows 10. I have also done a fair number of in-place upgrades to Windows 10. All of them were successful upgrades, although I had unique challenges with two of them that took time to resolve.

Microsoft released Windows 10 at the end of July 2015, and made it a free upgrade for most people. In the past six months, Microsoft has been pushing nag messages and prompts to remind you to upgrade to Windows 10.

But, with less than two months to go, Microsoft has upped the nagging to almost full scale trickery. The details can be read in this PCWorld article.

But here is the catch: you may think you are saying “No” to the Windows 10 upgrade by clicking on the X in the top right corner of the popup window. But it’s just the opposite. Clicking on the X is being treated the same as clicking on OK at the bottom of the window.

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Please be careful!

LogonUI.exe and Low Memory Warning on HP

I recently upgraded an HP 700-410xt workstation from Windows 8.1 Pro to Windows 10. The upgrade itself went very well, and the user noticed immediate improvement with the various Adobe suite of products that he uses.

However, he reported that the each morning his workstation would have an error message on the screen regarding LogonUI.exe, or a low memory warning:

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Note — he closes all his apps and locks the computer at night. I was able to monitor the computer that evening and identified that the LogonUI.exe service was indeed consuming all available memory.

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I did the normal effort of making sure that Windows 10 patches were up to date, as well as computer drivers. I even went so far as to disable any apps with “live tile” turned on.

Finally, several other MVPs that were trying to assist asked (1) is this an HP computer, and (2) were there any fingerprint or biometric software installed? The answer was YES to both questions. The computer in question had the HP Simplepass program installed, although the user was not using any fingerprint scan device.

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And then it turns out that this issue with LogonUI.exe has been affecting HP computers for at least two years, both on Windows 8.1 and Windows 10. In all cases, uninstalling software such as HP SimplePass or HP OmniPass fixed the low memory issue with LogonUI.exe!

I uninstalled HP Simplepass, rebooted the computer, and a day later, the user reported all was fine!

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Error 30143-37 When Installing Office 365 (Office 2016)

Customer had Office 2010 on his computer, and was upgrading to Office 2016 via his GoDaddy Office 365 account. But the installation would fail half way through  with error code 30143-37

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GoDaddy support said it was because anti-virus was running. We stopped A/V but still encountered the error. I then right clicked on the downloaded setup executable, selected Properties, and clicked to “unblock” the file. That did not help either.

I found a couple of web sites that suggested deleting (or at least renaming) the folder “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office 15”.

That seemed to do the trick, as I was able to then install Office 365. Note: I did NOT reboot the computer after deleting the folder.

Windows Live Mail Leaves Empty Temp Folders Behind

Are you using Windows Live Mail?

If so, you may have discovered lots of strange subfolders within your user’s Temp folder on your computer, with a name format like this {xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxx} :

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The clue is that all these folders are empty, and there is one for every day that you use Windows Mail. Apparently, the Windows Mail app does not properly clean up after itself.

As these folders all are empty (zero) in size, they really are not taking up disk space.

But, if you’re like me, I just don’t like seeing junk files hanging around. It’s perfectly fine to delete those empty folders:

  • Drill down to C: –> Users –> your username –> AppData –> Local
  • Highlight all those folders and click Delete.

If you got time on your hands, I’m sure there’s a powerscript or batch file somewhere on the Internet that you could use to do the same thing, and schedule it to run once a week. If you find one that works, please let me know!

Windows 10 Upgrade Prompt Coming Soon to a Domain Near You–Possibly

It’s hard to believe it was 5 1/2 months ago (July 2015) that Windows 10 was released. at that time Microsoft also announced a one year window of opportunity to upgrade your Windows 7/8.1 computer to Windows 10 for free.

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To encourage easy access to the Windows 10 upgrade, home PC’s (non-domain joined corporate/business PC’s) started seeing the Get Windows 10 (GWX) prompt at the bottom of their screen.

Microsoft has now announced that many business PC’s will soon be seeing the GWX taskbar icon and upgrade notification prompts. Eligible PC’s will be those domain joined PC’s running Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate, or Windows 8.1 Pro. PC’s running Windows 7 / 8.1 Enterprise are not eligible for the free upgrade.

But to receive the Get Windows 10 prompt, eligible computers must be receiving updates directly from Windows Update.

To word it differently, if your computers are receiving their updates from Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) or System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), then they will NOT see the Get Windows 10 prompts.

For more information, check out the article at ZDNet.

Review Microsoft License Terms

If you did not know, Microsoft provides a handy web page to view the licensing terms for all of its current products:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/useterms

Drop downs allow you to select the product, the version and the language.

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KB3114409 May Affect Outlook 2010 Settings

There are some reports that an Outlook 2010 update that was released today (KB3114409 Dec 8, 2015) may impact operations of Outlook 2010. You may find that it will only run in safe modem, or your Outlook settings may get reset to default, or configuration changes you make will not stick.

If so, uninstall KB3114409 for now. Read more here